Conversations With Cairo’s Small Businessmen

 

Before I introduce my new photo essay, please allow me to talk for a bit. I received two e-mails today that I’d like to share. The first comes from a reader of my pages from Texas in the United States, Jeff Jeter:

As I look at your photos each week, the images keep screaming that the people of Egypt aren’t much different than people anywhere else. They laugh, they cry, they have smiling children and revered elders, no different than my own family does. However, the mainstream media in the US has yet to show any of these similarities. All we see here are the angry students and so-called militants, hurling stones at anything resembling authority. The opinion of the media seems to be that Egypt is much worse off since the revolution than they were with Mubarak. Yet, your images and writings don’t seem to bear that out at all.

I have always thought that the saddest thing about the news is that it is rarely good. This simply fails to reflect the reality. Yes, there is a lot of suffering in the world. Yet in spite of this, there is also much joy, hope and positivity, and there are so many people striving to maintain their dignity in the face of many shades of adversity. Somehow, little of this makes the headlines. Why? Because it’s not considered ‘interesting’. This constant driving home to readers that calamity and evil are everywhere is responsible for false perceptions taking hold on a large scale. Egypt’s tourist industry is struggling right now because people perceive that the country is unsafe. Yet I have been here for almost three months and have experienced nothing but hospitality and warmth. I do not wish to suggest that everything is rosy. Yes, police and protesters clashed again in Tahrir Square a couple of nights ago. Yet the country is not falling apart. This is a time of transition, a process that will take time, and there remains so much to be hopeful for.

This brings me to the second e-mail, which I received from my friend Yulia in Belarus. I should add some context here: shortly before the Arab Awakening kicked off in Tunisia, protesting Belorussians who braved the extreme cold of their mid-winter to demonstrate against fraudulent elections that returned President Alexander Lukashenko to power for a fourth term were subject to a brutal crackdown by the country’s police. This made the news abroad briefly, but slipped out of popular awareness as momentum began to build in the Middle East and North Africa. Nevertheless, discontent has been simmering there since.

I think it really deserves respect that people in Cairo, Egypt are so brave and had so much courage to struggle till the end. Now they are free. However, Belorussian people continue to wait for something or someone who will help them. Now every Wednesday the opposition tries to gather people in the central square [of Minsk] for silent protest action. The government prohibited these actions. It’s the usual practice in our country to forbid everything that opposes the government. Prices are rising so fast to such a height that it’s scary to go to the shop. I do not know, but life in Belarus is becoming harder and harder. Something must be changed.

As Yulia confirms, Egyptians command great respect for what they have achieved by overthrowing a tyrannical regime. They are the envy of those large swathes of the world that still do not feel ‘freedom’, and many people in those countries still aspire to achieve what Egyptians have accomplished, in spite of the odds against them. While the Egyptian economy is struggling and people are feeling the pinch, one thing I’ve heard time and again is the expression of deep gratitude that they now know freedom. You’ll see this repeated several times in the photo essay I published today.

When a country’s economy goes through upheaval, the smallest businesses – those of sole traders and partnerships – are often the first to fold. This can be catastrophic for the families that depend on them for their daily bread. As part of our project on the hopes and visions of Egyptians, Hend Ismail and I met several Cairenes from a variety of different small (and, in some cases, ‘micro’) business occupations. This photo essay shares what we heard from a butcher, a baker, a carpet trader, an hotelier, a tyre repairer, a florist, a ceramic products seller, a taxi driver and the owner of the car driven by the taxi driver. We asked them about their experiences before and after the revolution, and found that on the whole, although they may be going through tough times in line with the Egyptian economy as a whole, they feel that the sacrifices are worth it and expect that conditions will gradually improve. Their sentiments seem to echo those of Karim Helal, group CEO of CI Capital Holding, who said last week that “the damage suffered by the economy is acceptable and it is the price of freedom”. Please click on the following image to read the photo essay now:

conversations with cairos small businessmen link Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

CLICK THE IMAGE to go to the photo essay.

 

Conversations With Cairo’s Small Businessmen

When a country’s economy goes through upheaval, the smallest businesses – those of sole traders and partnerships – are often the first to fold. This can be catastrophic for the families that depend on them for their daily bread. In this photo essay, Hend Ismail and I talk with nine Cairenes from a variety of different small (and, in some cases, ‘micro’) business occupations: a butcher, a baker, a carpet trader, an hotelier, a tyre repairer, a florist, a ceramic products seller, a taxi driver and the owner of the car driven by the taxi driver. We ask them about their experiences before and after the revolution, and find that on the whole, although they may be going through tough times in line with the Egyptian economy as a whole, they feel that the sacrifices are worth it and expect that conditions will gradually improve. Their sentiments seem to echo those of Karim Helal, group CEO of CI Capital Holding, who said last week that “the damage suffered by the economy is acceptable and it is the price of freedom”.

If you’d like to leave a comment about this photo essay, you are more than welcome to do so in the journal section: just click here and scroll to the bottom.

All the images below, along with others from the same series, may be purchased as beautiful colour prints, licensed for download or shared via social media platforms. To view them, just click directly on any of the images or on the ‘Buy | Share’ link at the end of any of the captions, which will take you to the gallery entitled ‘Conversations With Cairo’s Small Businessmen’ in my Image Archive.

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision butchers Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Hassan (left) and Haj Nafea (right) work together as butchers in a village on Dahab Island, situated in the middle of the River Nile. In a previous photo essay, I featured several of this island’s children, and mentioned that this is a place that feels like rural Egypt, even though it is technically not far from Central Cairo. Here, meat is hung from the eaves outside a village home, rather than being sold from a self-contained shop. We spend quite a long time with Hassan in particular, who clearly defies the popular stereotype that villagers are uneducated and consequently know little about governance. He feels that the Egyptian revolution has brought freedom. He sees that his country people have “woken up”, and predicts progress now that the old regime’s corrupt administrators have lost their positions. “Egyptians have the least requirements for life. We can live by eating very simple food: beans or lentils”, he tells us. “We just want to meet our life requirements: to eat, receive medication, educate our children and have safety and stability”. All he is asking for from those who govern is that they pay attention to citizens’ needs, rather than lining their own pockets. Though he does not know who will be running for office yet, he’s already decided who he will choose: “I will not give my vote to anyone except he who has done something for Egypt. Someone who’s trustworthy, has ethics and believes in what he’s doing. Someone who really puts what he says into practice and who achieves what he promises to. … Our president or prime minister … should be someone we really know. … Someone from the people. Someone who can solve our problems and understand our needs”. Hassan also has ideas about the type of political system Egypt needs: “authority should be divided … so that there’s space for differences of opinion and there can be discussion”, he explains, “rather than the country being run by someone purely to serve his own benefit”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo nasr city humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision future baker bread 1 Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Amr helps run a family bakery business in Nasr City. We pass by his shop to pick up some biscuits, which, alongside traditional Egyptian bread, are baked on site. While he packs up our order, we ask him about the revolution. He himself was not among the hundreds of thousands (sometimes millions) who packed Tahrir Square, but he emphasises how those times affected everyone. “I was helping by producing products to sell in the shop more than ever before”, he recalls. “Many people were buying bread, as they were afraid that they’d soon be unable to find food and there was a fear that flour and oil stocks would run out”. On the other side of that period, Egypt’s constitutional referendum was the first occasion on which Amr voted. “I’m planning to take this positive step again and participate in the presidential election”, he insists. “The lower classes … have the right to eat like the rest of us. … Our new president should feel these poor people, and know their needs. He shouldn’t be arrogant or selfish”. He adds, “he should fear God”. Does he think this is likely? “Insha’Allah (God willing), he will be a good man … who can take care of Egypt and purge the country of injustices”, he replies. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo khan el Khalili humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision future bazaar carpet salesman Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

“The butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker”, goes the English nursery rhyme. But next up is actually a carpet trader named Hossam, who runs a shop in the tourist-oriented souk (or bazaar) of Khan el-Khalili. As he sits back and relaxes in a chair at the back of his store, he recalls how things used to be before the revolution. “Whenever someone used to speak against the regime, they used to get taken away by State Security”, he tells us. “To avoid getting arrested or being placed under investigation, people would steer clear discussing such topics”. Like Hassan the butcher, he feels that what Egypt has now is ‘freedom’. “Now, people are not as afraid as they used to be to speak up”. Thinking for a moment about what he wants for his own field of work, he says that “I would like the new government to pay more attention to trade by encouraging exhibitions and businesspeople to travel and show what they can do outside Egypt”. Under Mubarak, getting to showcase one’s work outside the country was apparently impossible without paying bribes. “I hope that the incoming president will be loyal to this country”, Hossam stresses. “He should remember that God’s watching, and that one day He will ask him about what he did for the country”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo downtown tahrir square humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision sun hotel hostel tourism 1 Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Not long after I first arrived in Cairo, I moved into a room in Sun Hotel, situated on the ninth floor of an apartment block that overlooks iconic Tahrir Square. If I’d wanted to be a photojournalist, this would have been the perfect place to be based during the revolution. In fact, some of the photos in my album entitled ‘Egypt’s Ongoing Revolution’ were shot from my balcony there. I was keen to involve Mahmoud in this project because he has been an hotelier right at the heart of the revolution. “Tourism has been gravely affected”, he tells us. Looking out on protesters who have once again gathered in the Square below, he says that “people should … give the army a chance to work and rebuild the country, and to secure a good transition period”. It is not that he disagrees with the changes Egypt is experiencing, he just feels that they will take time and hence patience is necessary. “I participated in the referendum”, he goes on. “It was the first time for me to participate in a vote, and I did so because I felt that my voice would be heard and my vote could help change the country. I feel that it’s my right to participate in helping to change and rebuild the country”. Revealing his patriotic colours, like so many who proudly fly the Egyptian tricolour these days, he adds that “I wish to see Egypt better than anywhere else, because it’s like the mother of nations. … I will live and die on this land”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo maadi humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision tyre repairer Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

After moving out of Sun Hotel, I shifted to the suburb of Maadi. Khaled has a small tyre repairing business not five minutes’ walk from the apartment I moved into. Unlike the experience of the hotel industry, business doesn’t seem to have slackened for him – tyres keep on getting punctures! So we talk with him while he continues to work. “People changed after the revolution”, he observes, pointing out some small but significant differences. “People started to respect each other, and the way they deal with each other has changed. Before, they used to pass by without ever saying Salamu Alaykum (“peace be upon you“, the most common way to greet someone). Now they say this when they come”. This change in people’s ways feeds into the overall process of change in the country in a hugely important way, Khaled feels. “I wish for us all to achieve self-development, so that people treat each other well. It should be a priority to build our own selves first, before building the country, because we are the ones who must build this country”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo maadi humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision florist flowers Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Not far from Khaled’s workshop, Mohamed runs a small florist’s shop. He too recognises the need for personal development that Khaled mentioned, and speaks of the tremendous sense of empowerment that the revolution bestowed upon him. “My own life is in my hands”, he insists, confidently, before telling us of his intentions for the future. “I’ve been working in this shop for eight years and I love the business. I’m passionate about flowers! … I will start to read and research more in the field of flower arrangement, and come up with better designs. I want my shop to be special, so I need to come up with new ideas so that I’ll be unique in my field”. This sense of empowerment extends to politics, too. “It’s now in our hands to choose the right person to lead us”, Mohamed says. “We should not choose whoever is not keen enough on getting Egypt’s future right”. And he adds, “if the person who wins the election doesn’t turn out for the best, we have the right to change him”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo new fostat humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision roadside trader salesman ceramics Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Mahmoud’s business makes and sells garden ceramic products. It operates by the roadside in New Fostat, where he lays out his merchandise in the hope that passing drivers will notice something they like and stop. He tells us that since the revolution, it has become considerably easier to do an honest day’s work. “Before, to be able to do whatever you wanted to do, you had to make payouts. … People’s consciences have awakened”. His biggest problem used to be the regular disturbances to his business meted out by corrupt authorities. “It’s been four years since we’ve working here … and this land is legally ours”, he assures us. “We bought it and have the papers to prove it. So when we display our products on our land, there shouldn’t be any problem. Yet for the local council, it was an issue. They used to come with the Central Security cars and destroy or take our products, and they would never return them”. Since the revolution, life has been completely different. “On the second day of the revolution, all the workers came here to work, and we displayed our products outside. We didn’t fear anything anymore”. Based on this experience, Mahmoud feels more confident as he looks to the future. “The most important thing now is to refresh our economy”, he says, adding that at a more personal level, he has many hopes and dreams. In particular, he tells us that “I wish for my son to be able to enjoy a better standard of living”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo imbaba humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision taxi driver and owner  Conversations With Cairos Small Businessmen

Sayed (left) is a taxi driver, and Ibrahim (right) owns the car he drives. We catch up with them in their home locality of Imbaba, a district that recently became notorious for sectarian clashes between conservative Salafi Muslims and Coptic Christians that threatened to undermine the revolution (see my photo essay entitled ‘Visions of Unity’ and my audio slideshow ‘One Man’s March for Unity’ for more). In the light of this, we ask them how they feel about the ongoing political changes. “I definitely feel those changes”, replies Sayed. “God creates things that are good. … I wish more good to spread in the country; I want the situation … to become stable”. For him, this need to achieve fuller stability is Egypt’s biggest challenge at present. “We, as drivers, earn our wages on a daily basis, so we are affected when the country is not active”, he explains. “There shouldn’t be demonstrations every day”. He assures us that “the revolution was a miracle”, but stresses that “we are asking God to let the people calm down … so that we can earn our livings and raise our children”. To this, Ibrahim adds that “safety is one of life’s rights, and we are asking for it now. We wish to let our girls go out freely without fear or worry”. He remembers how State Security officers used to torture and abuse people under the old regime, and is thankful that this situation has changed. Now, he says, “we want our youth to assist the government and work with them hand in hand” to consolidate what has been achieved. In reference to the sectarian violence Imbaba suffered, he assures us that what the majority want is simply “to love each other” and get on with their lives. Buy | Share

 

Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

 

Welcome to the second in my news series, ‘Moments of the Week’. If you’re a fan of me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter, you can see each Moment of the Day, one by one, as I post them daily. This week’s images are drawn from my movements around and about Cairo, some featuring ordinary life from the streets, some from tourist hotspots and one from my work on the hopes and visions of Egyptians post-revolution. Enjoy, and please feel free to share using the buttons at the top, right and bottom of the page!

 

20110624 e1309428002512 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Friday 24th June 2011: The view from my Maadi balcony after a spot of evening rain.

 

20110625 e1309427985853 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Saturday 25th June 2011: A small boy re-arranges the furniture at al-Hakim Mosque in Old Cairo.

 

20110626 e1309427967343 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Sunday 26th June 2011: A colourful Sufi Dervish performance.

 

20110627 e1309427944275 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Monday 27th June 2011: The closest I've got to a belly dancer (so far).

 

20110628 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Tuesday 28th June 2011: Baker Amr Alaa Fatou packs up a biscuit order. Nasr City, Cairo.

 

20110629 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Wednesday 29th June 2011: Women and children stroll through al-Hakim Mosque in Old Cairo.

 

20110630 Moments of the Week – 24th to 30th June 2011

Thursday 30th June 2011: Two dogs enjoy the cooler air during the last light of the day in heavy Cairo traffic.

 

Egypt’s Next Generation

 

The images in the photo essay I published today are drawn from my first couple of months in Cairo. While some of the photographs were taken as part of my project on the hopes and visions of Egyptians post-revolution, most come from entirely random encounters. These are the faces of Egypt’s next generation, specifically those who call its capital city home.

I’ve been far from scientific here; by virtue of the ‘randomness’ of shooting you’ll find more of the children you might meet on the side of the road, and fewer of those who pass you by in the back of their parents’ air-conditioned cars. That’s ok, it’s not meant to be representative of Cairo as a whole. I just wanted to share some of my experiences with the youngest Egyptians I’ve met so far.

It’s often said that a country’s hopes for the future rest on the shoulders of its children. With the spirit I found in these young people, I’d say that things are looking up.

Please click on the following image to go to the photo essay now:

egypts next generation link Egypts Next Generation

CLICK THE IMAGE to go to the photo essay.

 

Egypt’s Next Generation

The images on this page are drawn from my first couple of months in Cairo. While some of the photographs were taken as part of my project on the hopes and visions of Egyptians post-revolution, most come from entirely random encounters. These are the faces of Egypt’s next generation, specifically those who call its capital city home.

I’ve been far from scientific here; by virtue of the ‘randomness’ of shooting you’ll find more of the children you might meet on the side of the road, and fewer of those who pass you by in the back of their parents’ air-conditioned cars. That’s ok, it’s not meant to be representative of Cairo as a whole. I just wanted to share some of my experiences with the youngest Egyptians I’ve met so far.

It’s often said that a country’s hopes for the future rest on the shoulders of its children. With the spirit I found in these young people, I’d say that things are looking up.

All the images below, along with others from the same series, may be purchased as beautiful colour prints, licensed for download or shared via social media platforms. To view them, just click on the ‘Buy | Share’ link at the end of any of the captions, which will take you to the gallery entitled ‘Egypt’s Next Generation’ in my Image Archive.

 

egypt cairo qarafa city of the dead humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision children painted house egyptian flag 4 Egypts Next Generation

Three girls from Qarafa pose in front of the wall they painted with Egypt’s colours to celebrate their country’s revolution. They told us, “We helped each other to paint the wall of the house. Each one chose a colour and was responsible for finishing her part. We drew the Egyptian flag because we all love Egypt. … The revolution made us love the country. We made progress by making the thief [President Mubarak] leave his position, so we became strong. We decided to show how happy we are by doing this on the walls. … We want to draw more, showing the Egyptian flag and 25th January. We want to do many things for Egypt. We want to draw everywhere. Inside our houses, too. … We want Egypt to be beautiful and happy with no crime. We want to see it clean, with all the people wearing good clothes, everyone going to school. We want Egypt to be better. We want Egypt to be the best because we love it”. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo downtown tahrir square revolution protest egyptian flag young boys carnival atmosphere Egypts Next Generation

Now that protests in Tahrir Square tend to have a carnival atmosphere to them, they are quite child-friendly affairs. Left: A boy dressed in his national flag during the Day of Justice and Cleansing. Centre: A young boy hands a small child an Egyptian flag to wave. Right: As a boy wrapped in the Egyptian flag looks on, the military stand firm against any possible surge as gifts are distributed to the public during the holiday of Sham el-Nessim. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo downtown tahrir square humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development street child interview children lamp post protesting Egypts Next Generation

Street children protested alongside everyone else during the revolution. Left: After hearing my colleague and I interview a protester, a street boy asks to hold my digital voice recorder and then proceeds to interview himself about his experiences during the revolution and his hopes for the future. Right: Having scaled a lamp post during the ‘Second Revolution’ protest, two street boys fly the Egyptian flag and make peace signs. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision boy donkey wall Egypts Next Generation

The next few photographs are from Dahab Island, in the middle of the River Nile. When one speaks of Dahab, most people think of the up-market resort. Many Cairenes don’t even know this island exists rights in the heart of their city. A short hop in a boat to the centre of the river brings the visitor to what feels like rural Egypt, a land with wheat fields, no paved roads and few public facilities to speak of. Here, a boy pauses to call out to his friends while sitting atop his donkey. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision children in house small child in doorway Egypts Next Generation

Left: Young children at home. Right: A curious little boy has a look around while his mother is busy shopping. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision smiling laughing boy girl Egypts Next Generation

Delighted young boy and girl grin for the camera. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision happy children girls Egypts Next Generation

Two pairs of friends, thrilled to be photographed. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo dahab island humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development hope vision village father son peace children climbing on each other Egypts Next Generation

Left: As dusk sets in over Dahab Island, a father makes the peace sign while his kids look on, amused. Right: Boys climb all over each other in their excitement to get in front of the lens, while the little girl in front is seemingly unaware of the commotion and struggle behind her. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo giza abu el nomros humanitarian social visual peacemaking revolution hope vision former criminal injured protester tahrir square father son children friends Egypts Next Generation

Left: In Abu el Nomros on the edge of Cairo, the son of a man we were interviewing sneaks into the shot and shares a delightful smile. His father is a reformed criminal; he lost the nerve to his left eye to the Egyptian military while protesting in Tahrir Square. On this day, he talked openly with us about his past and his hopes for a brighter future. Right: Four excitable young boys from the locality. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo maadi humanitarian social visual peacemaking poverty development street child girl pointing laughing happy Egypts Next Generation

This little girl starred in my journal entry of 17th May 2011, entitled ‘I made a little friend the other day…’. While I was sitting in the car in Maadi, waiting for my work partner, she spotted me and came to investigate. Left: When I pulled a funny face, she laughed and pointed me out to her brother. Right: Here she is again, saying hello properly after I wound the window down. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo maadi child labour poverty poor humanitarian development social hope vision trash collectors boy smoking Egypts Next Generation

A few blocks away, in another part of Maadi and on a different day, these young boys collect rubbish from the streets, just like the little girl above. They are unsurprisingly filthy, and their faces are pockmarked and scarred. The boy on the left has homemade stitches above his left eye. Two of them are already smokers, despite their tender ages. Life is evidently tough, yet their spirits are strong. A lot of smiles passed those three pairs of lips during our mini shoot, and they loved seeing their faces on the camera’s display afterwards. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo zamalak street child qarafa father and baby poverty poor humanitarian development social hope vision sad happy Egypts Next Generation

Left: This little boy sells herbs on the streets of the central Cairo district of Zamalak. He delighted in waving back and forth with me while I was sitting in a cafe on the Corniche of the Nile, and waited to try to sell me a bunch even after his fellow herb selling friends had left. Right: A proud father holds his child outside their home in Qarafa close to where we met the girls who painted their house with the colours of the Egyptian flag. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo nasr city st fatima british school humanitarian social visual peacemaking schoolboys focus group Egypts Next Generation

These final year schoolboys from St Fatima School in Nasr City formed an impromptu focus group for us, and talked willingly about the Egypt they hope to be a part of building. One of them had planned to leave the country to work after completing his education; he’s certain he won’t do that now. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo nasr city al azhar university humanitarian social visual peacemaking students Egypts Next Generation

On the other side of the threshold of adulthood, these undergraduate students from Al-Azhar University in Nasr City looked similarly to the post-revolution future as they talked with us. They see every Egyptian’s self-improvement as a key part of building this future, and say they have already started working on themselves in earnest. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo al azhar park humanitarian social visual peacemaking family child playground Egypts Next Generation

A family enjoys the weekend in al-Azhar Park in the heart of Old Cairo. During the revolution, the father took his son to Tahrir Square and photographed his son with the military and their tanks. He sees his son showing it to his own children in time, and telling them how he lived through a defining period in Egypt’s history. Buy | Share

 

egypt giza pyramids travel tourism boy playing flute mother daugher souvenir sellers Egypts Next Generation

Left: A small boy plays a home-made flute at the Pyramids of Giza. Right: A young girl takes a break from helping her mother sell souvenirs at the Pyramids. While we interview her mother, she speaks up, telling us that since the revolution hit tourist numbers, there hasn’t been sufficient income for the family to continue sending her to school. You can hear more from her mother in my photo essay, ‘Vision and Hope Among Egyptian Women’. Buy | Share

 

egypt cairo mokattam hill citadel old cairo al hakim mosque travel tourism leisure veiled woman son columns boy moving stools Egypts Next Generation

Left: A mother takes a break while her son strolls between the columns at Cairo’s iconic Citadel. Centre and right: A small boy re-arranges the furniture at al-Hakim Mosque in Old Cairo. Buy | Share